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Normandy Scholars Program

Executive Board, 2015-2017

Executive Director

Members

College of Arts and Sciences

College of Architecture and Design

College of Journalism and Electronic Media

Mary McAlpin is Professor of French in the Modern Foreign Languages and Literatures Department. She is a specialist in eighteenth-century French studies, with particular interests in memoirs by women eyewitnesses to the French Revolution, the intersection of the history of medicine and the history of the novel, and European representations of the Americas in the early modern period. She is the author of two books, including Female Sexuality and Cultural Degradation in Enlightenment France: Medicine and Literature (Ashgate Press, 2012). Her most recent article is a contribution to a collection on Montesquieu, Les Lettres persanes en leur temps, edited by Philip Stewart (Classiques Garnier, 2013).

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Sarah Lowe is Associate Professor of Graphic Design in the School of Art at the University of Tennessee. Her current work focuses on the development of mobile platforms designed to interpret sites of cultural heritage, building upon a career of researching and developing digital content for the cultural heritage sector. She has extensive experience working with cultural institutions including The National Park Service, The United States Holocaust Museum, and the Eastern Band of the Cherokee Nation. Her professional employment includes several years at WGBH, Boston's public television station, where her work in the Interactive Department focused on creating digital educational experiences, including web and DVD interfaces for American Experience, Annenburg Media and various R+D projects. Her interest in culture history has led to work for the Highlander Center, the Beck Cultural Center (East Tennessee's largest repository of African-American history), Panther Creek State Park and the W.E.B. DuBois Center at Harvard University. She spent the 2012-2013 academic year working on a Fulbright as a visiting researcher with InterMedia at the University of Oslo.

http://art.utk.edu/graphic_design/faculty/faculty.html

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Martin Griffin is associate professor in the Department of English. He is the author of Ashes of the Mind: War and Memory in Northern Literature, 1865-1900 (University of Massachusetts Press, 2009) and Narrative, Identity, and the Map of Cultural Policy: Once Upon a Time in a Globalized World (co-authored with Constance DeVereaux, Ashgate, 2013). Together with the novelist Christopher Hebert, he is jointly editing an essay collection entitled American Political Fictions which will explore the connections between literary forms and political expression from the Puritan era to the present day. His current research interests focus on two areas in particular: on the espionage novel as a site of 20th century memory, and on the intersections, historical and contemporary, of literature, foreign service, and international relations.

http://english.utk.edu/peopletwo/martin-griffin-2/

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Katherine Ambroziak's research and teaching examines how designers and users become conscious of their built and natural environment and what this may mean to the generation of healthy perceptions and memory. She focuses on cultural studies, spatial theory related to sensory response and body perception, ritual theory, and contemporary memorial theory. In 1996, she and her partner, Brian Ambroziak, were Stage II Finalists for the World War II National Memorial Design Competition in Washington, D.C. Together they have collaborated on over two dozen theoretical, competition, and commissioned designs, including ten memorials and four interactive installations. A licensed architect in the State of Tennessee, she is active in community engagement as both an academic and civic pursuit. Since 2009, she has served as the primary designer and coordinator of the Odd Fellows Cemetery and Potters Field Rehabilitation Project, a conservation and reclamation initiative that aims to educate and support the communities of East Knoxville through the design and future implementation of a sustainable memorial landscape.

http://archdesign.utk.edu/faculty-staff/facultystaff/katherine-ambroziak/

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Margaret Anderson is Assistant Professor of History at UTK. She is a historian of Modern France and Empire, with areas of focus in family policy, pronatalism, migration, and settler colonialism. Her forthcoming book examines the ways in which France's position as an imperial power shaped debates about the French birthrate during the Third Republic (1870-1940). Her latest research focuses on the establishment of a wide range of family benefits and social welfare services in colonial Morocco during the Second World War, most notably the Office de la Famille Française (FFO) and the Caisse d'Action Sociale (CAS). Her examination of these benefits and administrative bodies touches on larger questions concerning migration within the French Empire, settler politics in Morocco, questions of race and gender in family policy, and the place of colonial family policy within larger questions of collaboration and resistance during the Vichy period.

http://history.utk.edu/peopletwo/margaret-anderson/

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Monica Black is Associate Professor of History at UT-Knoxville. Some of her areas of specialization concern the impact of war on culture and society in Europe, especially in Germany over the course of the 20th century. She has also written about death and funerary rituals, about the legacies of mass death and violence, and about ghosts, especially as these are connected with the memorialization of warfare and violence. She has particular methodological and historical interests in folklore, rumors, and other oral traditions and practices.

http://history.utk.edu/peopletwo/monica-black/

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Sébastien Dubreil's research interests include the definition of culture in the foreign language classroom, its place in the curriculum, the use of multimedia technologies (video, the Internet) and telecollaboration in the teaching of culture, and the methods of assessment of culture learning. He has also published in the area of French and Francophone cinema and presented on the linguistic situation in his native region of Brittany.

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Ernest Freeberg's research and teaching interests include the impact of war on democracy, a topic he explored in a book on the American struggle over the right of free speech in World War One: (Democracy's Prisoner: Eugene V. Debs, the Great War, and the Right to Dissent.) He continues to work on the topic of the American experience in World War One, with particular interest in the religious, cultural and social impact of that conflict on the "lost generation," both those young Americans who served in France and those who remained on the home front.

http://history.utk.edu/peopletwo/ernest-freeberg/

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Gabriel Liulevicius is a specialist in modern German history, especially German relations with Eastern Europe. He earned his Ph.D. at the University of Pennsylvania in 1994. He has taught at UT since 1995 and has received three teaching awards from the University. He currently serves as Director of the Center for the Study of War and Society. He is the author of War Land on the Eastern Front:Culture, National Identity and German Occupation in World War I (Cambridge University Press, 2000), which also appeared in German translation in 2002, and The German Myth of the East, 1800 to the Present (Oxford University Press, 2009). He has recorded five courses on tape with The Great Courses company, on topics including World War I, European diplomatic history, and espionage.

http://history.utk.edu/peopletwo/vejas-gabriel-liulevicius/

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Dan Magilow is Associate Professor of German and currently Chair of the German Program in the Department of Modern Foreign Languages and Literatures. His research interests include Holocaust Studies, Weimar Germany, Cinema Studies, and the history of photography. Dr. Magilow has authored, co-authored, or edited four books about topics such as Holocaust representation, photography in Germany in the late-1920s, and the image of National Socialism in low-brow cinema and culture. He has also published several articles on atrocity photography, Holocaust memorials, exile literature, and German film. He regularly teaches courses related to all of these topics.

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Brandon Prins is Professor of Political Science at the University of Tennessee. He is currently Director of Graduate Studies in the Department of Political Science, Global Security Fellow at the Howard H. Baker., Jr. Center for Public Policy, and Head of the Policy, Law, and Diplomacy division of the Institute for Nuclear Security at UTK. He also serves as an Associate Editor on the editorial team of Foreign Policy Analysis. Prins' research focuses on the causes and consequences of political violence within and between nation-states. Much of his work has examined how domestic political institutions influence leader decisions to use military force, particularly in the United States. Currently Prins has three research projects that he is working on. One addresses the geo-spatial conditions associated with modern maritime piracy. The second explores the issue of territory and how it conditions conflict escalation. The third project explores the principal drivers of domestic terrorism in democratic states. Prins teaches courses on U.S. national security policy, political violence, and nuclear non-proliferation.

http://bakercenter.utk.edu/experts/brandon-prins/

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Amber Roessner, an assistant professor of journalism and electronic media, often considers the role of mass media as a unique site of collective memory in her cultural histories. As a doctoral student at the University of Georgia in Athens, she assisted Janice Hume with a study of the role of Southern newspapers and magazines in contributing to the lost cause and salvation mythologies surrounding small Georgia towns spared from the destruction of Sherman's March during the Civil War. Her first book, Inventing Baseball Heroes (LSU Press, 2014), considered the collective memory of Ty Cobb and Christy Mathewson, two of America's most prominent cultural heroes of the early twentieth century, and a series of recent collaborative studies has explored the politics of memory surrounding controversial American figures such as Ida B. Wells-Barnett and Jack Johnson and controversial legislation such as Title IX. Roessner looks forward to additional explorations in this fruitful area as she continues work on her second book, which considers Jimmy Carter's rise to the presidency in 1976, and a variety of edited volumes.

http://jem.cci.utk.edu/users/amber-roessner

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Maria Stehle is Associate Professor of German with a main research focus on contemporary Germany and Europe, media studies, and gender studies. Dr. Stehle teaches courses on modern German literature and culture and on the cultural history of the 20th century. She regularly offers a course on Berlin in the 20th and 21st centuries with a faculty-led study abroad component. This course explores questions of space and memory and how historic trauma resonates in contemporary culture.

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